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SugrCard.com – Add Some Sugar To Your Messages

SugrCard.com“Messages made sweeter” is the tagline of this application. The meaning of this phrase becomes crystal clear upon giving the site even a brief glance.

 

Essentially, SugrCard will let you make your tweets, photos and notes become “sweeter” by combining them with graphical elements. Once any tweet or message has undergone that process, it can be shared the social way – EG, through blogs, e-mail, and tweets. US residents can also share the results using mobile phones.

One of the best uses you can put this system to is creating cards to introduce yourself to others. The templates of these cards have actually been devised by professional graphic artists, so that you know they will have an appeal of their own. In addition to these contact cards the system makes it possible for you to come up with “photocards” – again, the frames have been created by professional artists. In this case, you simply choose the boarder to go with your photo and add a personal message.

Miscellaneous uses include the ability to poke friends, and also a feature that lets you share any friend’s contact information with others. Aptly enough, the latter feature is named “Share a friend”.

SugrCard.com In Their Own Words

“Make your text, wallpaper, tweets, photos and notes stand out by adding some Sugr. Combine graphics, style, photos and notes and share to any email, mobile phone (U.S. only), send to your social network, or post to your Twitter account.”

Why SugrCard.com It Might Be A Killer

It is a more memorable way of putting yourself across.

Some Questions About SugrCard.com

Will the service ever become fully available (IE, support for mobile devices) outside the US? SugrCard.com

Author : Roger Hollings

Born and bred in Maine, Roger is one of the longest-standing writers for KillerStartups.com. A translator by trade, he is passionate about art in all its forms. He enjoys both classic and contemporary literature, nature photography and music from both sides of the Atlantic. Fascinated by technology from an early age, he has always explored the ways in which computers let people articulate their thoughts and communicate better with the world at large.

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